Three things you probably didn’t know about the Queen’s fashion style

Three things you probably didn’t know about the Queen’s fashion style

Queen Elizabeth was an icon, a symbol of constancy and longevity, and her clothes and style reflected that

THE world is mourning the death of Queen Elizabeth II, who died Thursday, September 8, at her Balmoral residence in Scotland. More than a page turning, it’s an entire book that’s closing, ending a reign that spanned over 70 years – a record. The next few days will be devoted to celebrating and honouring the memory of the British monarch, and focusing on the highlights of her life and reign.

This could make you think that everything is known about the Queen, right down to her clothing choices. And it’s true that her taste for brightly coloured outfits was evident, not to mention her unwavering loyalty to her Launer handbag, her affection for pearls, or her willingness to convey messages through brooches, patterns and other subtle signs. But her style still holds many secrets that you might not know about.

Weights concealed in her hems

(FILES) In this file photo taken on July 21, 2016 shows exhibits on display at the “Fashioning a Reign: 90 Years of Style from The Queen’s Wardrobe” exhibition inside Buckingham Palace in London. – Brightly coloured outfits, a matching hat and a pristine pair of gloves: Queen Elizabeth II’s look was instantly recognisable and a self-created uniform styled to suit her role. During her reign, the monarch tried out every shade in the colour chart, from canary yellow to lime green, fuchsia and navy blue. Her inimitable style was developed over the decades by aides and designers, starting with Norman Hartnell, who created her wedding dress when she married Prince Philip in 1947. (Photo by JUSTIN TALLIS / AFP) / EMBARGOED FOR PRINT AND ONLINE UNTIL 00:01 BST FRIDAY, 22 JULY 2016 / “The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by JUSTIN TALLIS has been modified in AFP systems in the following manner: ADDING EMBARGO: EMBARGOED FOR PRINT AND ONLINE UNTIL 00:01 BST FRIDAY, 22 JULY 2016
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Have you ever seen Queen Elizabeth II caught off-guard by a gust of wind, running after one of her hats, or holding her skirt against her legs to avoid a Marilyn Monroe-like scene? Of course, you haven’t. That would have been unimaginable for Her Majesty, who was always poised and flawless, without a stitch out of line.

Today, it’s safe to say that her style crossed the ages without any such mishaps. And this is notably thanks to the tips and tricks of her regular dressmakers and wardrobe advisors, including Norman Hartnell and Angela Kelly, who revealed more about the secrets of the Queen’s style in her book, The Other Side of the Coin: The Queen, the Dresser and the Wardrobe.

We now know, for example, that weights were carefully selected and inserted into the seams, lapels and hems of the monarch’s coats, suits, dresses and hats, so that she would not have to suffer the misfortunes of the elements. This prevented her from having to face any kind of wardrobe malfunction, holding everything perfectly in place. It was an infallible trick that she used for decades.

A multifunction handbag

(FILES) In this file photo taken on June 15, 2017 Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II keeps hold of her handbag as she tours the classrooms at Mayflower Primary School during a visit to Poplar in Tower Hamlets in East London, as part of commemorations to mark the centenary of the bombing of Upper North Street School during the First World War. – Brightly coloured outfits, a matching hat and a pristine pair of gloves: Queen Elizabeth II’s look was instantly recognisable and a self-created uniform styled to suit her role. During her reign, the monarch tried out every shade in the colour chart, from canary yellow to lime green, fuchsia and navy blue. Her inimitable style was developed over the decades by aides and designers, starting with Norman Hartnell, who created her wedding dress when she married Prince Philip in 1947. (Photo by Daniel LEAL / POOL / AFP)

We know that the Queen was not a fan of it-bags, nor of trends of folklore. While her outfits were carefully scrutinised, her handbag seemed – like her – eternal. She was faithful to this piece for several decades, right up to her death.

Hers was a handbag finished in smooth patent leather from the London leather goods house Launer, of which she owned in several hundred versions, and it only ever contained the bare essentials. The design underwent some modifications to allow it to always fit her wrist.

But this is not her handbag’s most surprising feature. For lack of being able to communicate verbally with her staff during her official outings and engagements, Elizabeth II used this accessory to convey messages.

Some people blink, others put their hands in or out of their pockets, but the Queen used her handbag to send signals to her relatives and advisors. At least, such is the rumour that surrounded this trusty item that seems to have accompanied her everywhere.

According to the said rumour – never confirmed nor denied – Her Majesty would use her handbag to make it clear that she was ready to move on from her current conversation. She would do this by passing it from one wrist to another. And if the Queen put her handbag on the ground, the situation was even more critical, signalling the monarch’s desire for an imminent escape.

A fashion icon?

The Queen’s style is inimitable, that’s a fact. While her outfits were watched and analysed, just like those of Kate Middleton, to call Elizabeth II a fashion icon is probably a bit of an exaggeration.

Still, Britain’s Queen caused a sensation at London Fashion Week in February 2018, when she turned up to attend – on the front row, of course – the show staged by the upcoming designer Richard Quinn, to whom she presented the ‘Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design.’ It was a first for the then 91-year-old monarch, who took in the show sitting next to the fashion’s high priestess, Anna Wintour.

It was a powerful moment for the history of fashion that had never before seen the Queen anywhere near a catwalk, as well as a major sign of recognition for Richard Quinn. The designer reacted solemnly to the death of Elizabeth II via an Instagram Story, posting a black and white portrait of the Queen, a broad smile on her lips, accompanied by a heart.

source – ETX Daily Up

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